NHS trust failed to investigate hundreds of deaths

The NHS has failed to investigate the unexpected deaths of more than 1,000 people since 2011 according to a new report.

The NHS has failed to investigate the unexpected deaths of more than 1,000 people since 2011 according to a new report.

It blames a “failure of leadership” at Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust and that the deaths of mental health and learning disability patients were not properly examined.

Southern Health said it “fully accepted” the quality of processes for investigating and reporting a death needed to be better, but had improved.

The trust is one of the country’s largest mental health trusts, covering Hampshire, Dorset, Wiltshire, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire and providing services to about 45,000 people.

The investigation, commissioned by NHS England and carried out by Mazars, a large audit firm, looked at all deaths at the trust between April 2011 and March 2015.

During that period, it found 10,306 people had died. Most were expected. However, 1,454 did not.

Of those, 272 were treated as critical incidents, of which just 195 – 13% – were treated by the trust as a serious incident requiring investigation (SIRI).

The likelihood of an unexpected death being investigated depended hugely on the type of patient.

The most likely group to see an investigation was adults with mental health problems, where 30% were investigated. For those with learning disability the figure was 1%, and among over-65s with mental health problems it was just 0.3%.

The average age at death of those with a learning disability was 56 – over seven years younger than the national average.

Even when investigations were carried out, they were of a poor quality and often extremely late, the NHS England report says.

Repeated criticisms from coroners about the timeliness and usefulness of reports provided for inquests by Southern Health failed to improve performance, while there was often little effort to engage with the families of the deceased.

Key findings from the report

  • The trust could not demonstrate a comprehensive systematic approach to learning from deaths
  • Despite the trust having comprehensive data on deaths, it failed to use it effectively
  • Too few deaths among those with learning disability and over-65s with mental health problems were investigated, and some cases should have been investigated further
  • In nearly two thirds of investigations, there was no family involvement

The reasons for the failures, says the report, lie squarely with senior executives and the trust board.

There was no “effective” management of deaths or investigations or “effective focus or leadership from the board”, it says.

Even when the board did ask relevant questions, the report says, they were constantly reassured by executives that processes were robust and investigations thorough.

The culture of Southern Health, which has been led by Katrina Percy since it was created in 2011, “results in lost learning, a lack of transparency when care problems occur, as well as lack of assurance to families that a death was not avoidable and has been properly investigated,” the report says.

UK pays less for cancer drugs than some countries

The UK is paying less for new cancer drugs than a number of other high income countries, according to a report in The Lancet Oncology.

The UK is paying less for new cancer drugs than a number of other high income countries, according to a report in The Lancet Oncology

While the UK, Greece, Spain and Portugal pay the least, on average, for the drugs they use, Germany, Sweden and Switzerland pay the most.

The authors said more transparency was needed because some countries risked overpaying for drugs. The pharmaceutical industry said the UK was getting a fair deal on medicines.

Prices of cancer drugs have risen steeply in recent years, placing major stress on many healthcare systems, including the NHS.

The report said drugs had accounted for nearly a third of the EU’s £37 billion cancer healthcare spending in 2009.

And the researchers then compared the 2013 price of 31 cancer drugs in 18 high-income countries, including the UK, Australia, New Zealand, France, Greece, Switzerland, Sweden and Portugal.

Prices in Greece were the lowest for 14 out of the 24 cancer drugs available there.

The price of drugs in the UK was also low.

Prices of drugs in Switzerland, Germany and Sweden were frequently the highest – and for some drugs, such as interferon alfa 2b to treat leukaemia and skin cancer, were twice as high.

The price figures come from the Pharma Price Information service in Austria, which details what manufacturers charge per unit – a single tablet or vial of a drug, for example.

But although the official list prices published in this report are freely available, any further discounts – which are often negotiated by organisations in different countries – remain confidential.

David Watson, director of pricing and reimbursement at the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry, said the report was evidence that newer medicines “are affordable in the UK”.

He said the UK was “getting a fair deal with regards to medicines pricing” and the NHS was “getting good value for money”.