Healthier lifestyles could cut cancer cases by a third

About a third of cancer cases in the UK could be prevented if people ate healthily, exercised more and cut down on alcohol according to new research.

About a third of cancer cases in the UK could be prevented if people ate healthily, exercised more and cut down on alcohol according to new research
Exercise is an important way of keeping fit and cutting body fat, which is linked to the risk of developing cancer.

Data from the World Cancer Research Fund suggests that 20,000 cases of breast cancer and about 19,000 cases of bowel cancer could be stopped each year with small changes in lifestyle.

In 2013, there were more than 351,000 new cases of cancer in the UK. The WCRF said 84,000 could have been prevented.

Head of research Dr Rachel Thompson said simple changes to diet and lifestyle could make “a huge difference” in the battle against cancer.

“Even minor adjustments, like 10 to 15 extra minutes of physical activity each day, cutting down on alcohol, or limiting your intake of high calorie foods and sugary drinks, will help decrease your cancer risk,” she said.

She said that after cutting out smoking, being a healthy body weight was the most important thing people could do to cut their risk of getting cancer.

“There is strong evidence that being overweight or obese increases the risk of 10 cancers,” she said.

The link between a healthy lifestyle and the risk of developing cancer is well known, and this new data looks at preventable cases in 13 of the UK’s most common cancers.

For example, among men, 9% of cases of advanced prostate cancer could be prevented every year if men were not overweight or obese.

Lung cancer cases could be cut by 15,000 (33%) by getting people to stop smoking.

And 38% of breast cancer cases could be prevented, particularly in postmenopausal women, by increasing physical exercise and reducing body fat.

The WCRF also said that 2,200 cases of kidney cancer and 1,400 cases of pancreatic cancer could be prevented if people adopted a healthier lifestyle.

Prof Kevin Fenton, director of health and wellbeing at Public Health England, said the UK was currently behind on cancer survival rates compared with other European countries.

He said one major factor was that cancer prevention was not in the public consciousness.

“The link between tobacco and cancer is widely known and readily accepted by the public, but many are not yet fully convinced that healthy eating, regular exercise and not drinking alcohol, can lower your cancer risk.”

From: https://www.fithealthylives.com/2016/06/healthier-lifestyles-could-cut-cancer-cases-by-a-third-2/

Health bodies call for drugs to be decriminalised

Two leading public health organisations have called for the possession and personal use of all illegal drugs to be decriminalised in the UK.

Two leading public health organisations have called for the possession and personal use of all illegal drugs to be decriminalised in the UK.
The Royal Society for Public Health and the Faculty of Public Health said the government’s approach to drugs policy had failed.  There should be a greater focus on treatment and education, they added.

The report, called Taking A New Line On Drugs, said criminal sanctions failed to deter illegal drug use, undermined people’s life chances and could act as a barrier to addicts coming forward for help.

It called for a “sea change in approach” and said the UK should adopt the Portuguese system under which people caught using drugs were offered treatment and support rather than being punished. However, dealers and suppliers would still be prosecuted.

The report also suggested that drugs education be made mandatory, and that responsibility for drugs policy be moved from the Home Office to the Department of Health.

Royal Society for Public Health chief executive Shirley Cramer said: “For too long, UK and global drugs strategies have pursued reductions in drug use as an end in itself, failing to recognise that harsh criminal sanctions have pushed vulnerable people in need of treatment to the margins of society, driving up harm to health and wellbeing even as overall use falls.

“On many levels, in terms of the public’s health, the ‘war on drugs’ has failed.”

“The time has come for a new approach, where we recognise that drug use is a health issue, not a criminal justice issue, and that those who misuse drugs are in need of treatment and support – not criminals in need of punishment.”

Baroness Molly Meacher, speaking on behalf of the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Drug Policy Reform, welcomed the report.

She said the current system “criminalises some users of psychoactive drugs whilst very harmful psychoactive drugs including alcohol and tobacco remain legal”.

A Home Office spokesman said: “The UK’s approach on drugs remains clear – we must prevent drug use in our communities and support people dependent on drugs through treatment and recovery.

“At the same time, we have to stop the supply of illegal drugs and tackle the organised crime behind the drugs trade.”

The spokesman said there had been a drop in drug misuse over the past decade and more people were recovering from dependency now than in 2009-10.

Health Direct has for a long time noted the costly failure that is the current policy on drugs. On August 02, 2006 in Risks of taking drugs compared- Scientific review of dangers of drugtaking- Drugs, the real deal we reproduced the first ranking based upon scientific evidence of harm to both individuals and society.

It was devised by government advisers – then ignored by ministers because of its controversial findings. The analysis was carried out by David Nutt, the then senior member of the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs, and Colin Blakemore, the chief executive of the Medical Research Council.

NHS health staff crisis is worse than cash woes

The growing crisis in healthcare professionals’ morale is a greater risk to the NHS than the financial problems it is grappling with.

The growing crisis in healthcare professionals' morale is a greater risk to the NHS than the financial problems it is grappling with
Nigel Edwards, chief executive of the Nuffield Trust think tank, warned staff shortages, disputes with government and bullying were creating a “toxic mix”.

He said if the problems persisted, the affinity staff felt for the NHS could be irreparably broken.

The warning comes amid growing tensions between the healthcare workforce and government ministers.

This year has seen a series of strikes by junior doctors in England, while nurses and midwives have been protesting about plans to scrap the bursaries they receive while they are studying.

Mr Edwards said this industrial unrest was happening at a time when there were looming shortages – last month, a report by the Public Accounts Committee warned the NHS was short of about 50,000 staff out of a front line workforce of just over 800,000.

The most recent staff survey – published earlier this year – also highlighted the problem, with only 31% of respondents saying there was enough staff for them to do their jobs properly.

The Nuffield Trust also pointed to feedback it had received from health managers warning about deteriorating morale and uncontrollable growth in workload.

One manager said there was a “creeping sense of inevitability and acceptance that failure will happen at some point”.

Mr Edwards said the care and compassion of health workers was underpinned by a “psychological” contract.

He said while financial problems – last month it was revealed NHS trusts had overspent by a record £2.45 billion in 2015-16 – could be rectified in time, deteriorating morale was harder to fix.

“Once the psychological contract with staff is broken, it may be impossible to reverse,” he added.

Siva Anandaciva, of NHS Providers, which represents NHS trusts, said he shared the concerns. “This is a pivotal time for the NHS, with extreme financial and capacity challenges putting extra pressure on staff,” he said. “Perhaps inevitably, staff morale can take a battering.”

A Department of Health spokeswoman said there were signs in the staff survey that some measures were improving.

She added: “Good leadership is the single most critical ingredient to raising morale in any team. We also see that the best hospitals combine tight financial grip, an unrelenting focus on improving patient care and high levels of staff engagement.”

Health Direct notes frequent HR research which finds that levels of staff morale inversely correlates with managements’ staff appreciation in many organisations- the NHS is no expection Mr Hunt.