Female lung cancer cases top 20,000

Cases of lung cancer in women have reached 20,000 a year in the UK for the first time since records began.

Female lung cancer cases top 20,000The figure for 2012 represents a rise from 14,000 in 1993, according to the data compiled by Cancer Research UK.

It means the rate of lung cancer in the female population has risen by 22% to 65 cases per 100,000 people.

The trend is the opposite of what is happening with men and is linked to smoking-  which peaked in men in the 1940s but in women peaked in the 1970s.

About 24,000 men are diagnosed with lung cancer each year, which means it is the second most common cancer for both sexes.

Prof Caroline Dive, from Cancer Research UK, said: “It really is devastating to see that the number of women diagnosed with lung cancer continues to climb.”

“We also know survival remains poor and one of the problems is that lung cancer tends to be diagnosed at a late stage when it has already spread.”

That makes it hard to treat and as a result lung cancer claims the lives of 35,000 people each year.

Just 10% of people live for five years after diagnosis – compared with more than 80% for breast and prostate cancer.

Prof Dive said efforts were being made to tackle this with lung cancer one of its key priorities of its research strategy.

The work focuses on a new technique to carry out a biopsy using magnets to capture rogue cancer cells in the blood of patients – potentially providing vital information on the biology of the disease, which could help improve treatment.

But as well as investing in new treatment techniques, Nell Barrie, senior science communication manager at Cancer Research UK, said: “It’s vital that we keep on fighting against lung cancer.”

“It’s the biggest cancer killer in the UK so the government and health service must work to help smokers quit by providing more stop smoking services to help people give up this deadly addiction.”

Health Direct laments the sad increase in female lung cancers as these deaths are wholly preventable.

New drug may delay Alzheimer’s decline

New research of how a new drug could slow the pace of brain decline for patients with early stage Alzheimer’s disease have emerged.

New research of how a new drug could slow the pace of brain decline for patients with early stage Alzheimer's diseaseData from pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly suggests its Solanezumab drug can cut the rate of the dementia’s progression by about a third.

The results, presented to a US conference, are being met with cautious optimism. A new trial is due to report next year and should provide definitive evidence.

The death of brain cells in Alzheimer’s is currently unstoppable. Solanezumab may be able to keep them alive.

Current medication, such as Aricept, can manage only the symptoms of dementia by helping the dying brain cells function.

But solanezumab attacks the deformed proteins, called amyloid, that build up in the brain during Alzheimer’s.

It is thought the formation of sticky plaques of amyloid between nerve cells leads to damage and eventually brain cell death.

Solanezumab has long been the great hope of dementia research, yet an 18-month trial of the drug seemingly ended in failure in 2012.

But when Eli Lilly looked more closely at the data, there were hints it could be working for patients in the earliest stages of the disease. It appeared to slow progression by around 34% during the study.

So the company asked just over 1,000 of the patients in the original trial with mild Alzheimer’s to take the drug for another two years.

And positive results from this extension of the original trial have now been presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference.

They show those taking the drugs the longest had the most benefit.

Dr Eric Siemers, from the Lilly Research Laboratories, in Indiana, said “It’s another piece of evidence that solanezumab does have an effect on the underlying disease pathology. We think there is a chance that solanezumab will be the first disease-modifying medication to be available.”

The company also started a completely separate trial in mild patients in 2012, and these results could prove to be the definitive moment for the drug.

At the moment there is no medication that can slow down dementia. If such a drug was developed it could transform how the disease is managed.

People would still get worse, but they would spend more time in the milder phase of the degenerative disease rather than needing constant care.

In a field that has been plagued by repeated disappointment, even a hint of such a drug is an exciting moment.

Next year, when further trial results are due, we will know for certain whether solanezumab is the breakthrough everyone hopes it could be.

Dr Eric Karran, the director of research at Alzheimer’s Research UK, said “If this gets replicated, then I think this is a real breakthrough in Alzheimer’s research. Then, for the first time, the medical community can say we can slow Alzheimer’s, which is an incredible step forward.”

“These data need replicating, this is not proof, but what you can say is it is entirely consistent with a disease-modifying effect. We’ve never ever had evidence that we can affect the disease process.”

Many NHS hospital patients complain of lack of dignity

A fifth of people in hospital in England are not always treated with respect and dignity according to new research.

A fifth of people in hospital in England are not always treated with respect and dignityAnalysis of the 2012 poll has found that poor care was more likely to be experienced by those aged over 80. It also found that more than a third of patients who need help at mealtimes did not receive enough assistance.

Age UK, which helped to advise the researchers, said there had been “remarkably little change” over time in the care experienced by older patients.

The report, carried out by the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion at the LSE, found that poor or inconsistent care was more likely to be experienced by women as well as the over-80s.

The risks were also higher for those with a long-standing illness or disability like deafness or blindness, with those in hospital for a long period, or who stayed in three or more wards, at an even greater risk.

The report was compiled using evidence from the Adult Inpatient Survey 2012, which covers people aged 16 or above who stayed in hospital for at least one night.

According to the report: “There was a widespread and systematic pattern of inconsistent or poor standards of care during hospital stays in England in 2012.”

“Patient experiences of inconsistent or poor standards of dignity and help with eating do not appear to be limited to isolated ‘outlier’ providers. Rather, this appears to be a significant general problem affecting the vast majority of NHS acute hospital trusts.”

The researchers found 23% of patients reported experiencing poor or inconsistent standards of dignity and respect, the equivalent to 2.8 million people a year, of whom a million would be aged 65 and over.

They also found that a quarter of all respondents said they needed help with eating during their hospital stay, amounting to just under 3.5 million patients a year.

Of those who needed help with eating, 38% said they only sometimes, or never, received enough help from staff – equivalent to 1.3 million people a year, and 640,000 aged 65 and over.

Age UK charity director Caroline Abrahams said: “It must be recognised that the data this research is based on is two years old now and that the newest figures suggest some welcome improvement, especially as regards older people’s experiences of dignity, but this sobering report certainly shows that hospitals need to redouble their efforts.”

“Above all it is really worrying, if perhaps not altogether surprising, that the more vulnerable an older person is, the greater their risk of not being treated as we would all wish for ourselves or our loved ones.”

“Turning this situation around ought to be a top priority and no hospital can afford to be complacent.”

NHS to show cost of missed appointments to patients

Patients who miss appointments will be shown how much they have cost the NHS.

Patients who miss appointments will be shown how much they have cost the NHS.The NHS estimates more than 12 million appointments are missed each year

Overall, missed GP and hospital appointments cost the health service in England nearly £1bn a year, Jeremy Hunt said in a speech this week.

He said he sympathised with the idea of charging patients for missing GP appointments, although there are no plans for this to happen.

But he said people would have to “take personal responsibility” for NHS funds.

In a measure announced in a speech to the Local Government Association on Wednesday, Mr Hunt said he planned to display the cost of prescription medicines on packets.

The figure and the words “funded by the UK taxpayer” will be added to all packs costing more than £20 in England.

The move is part of efforts to reduce the £300 million bill for “wasted” medication, which is prescribed but not used.

In the same speech, he said missed GP appointments cost the taxpayer £162 million and missed hospital appointments cost £750 million.

Mr Hunt told the Question Time programme that NHS resources were stretched already, adding there would be more than one million extra people aged over 70 by the end of the current parliament.

“If we’re going to square the circle and have a fantastic NHS, despite all those pressures, then we have to take personal responsibility for the way that we use NHS resources,” he said.

Mr Hunt told the audience in Essex he did not have a “problem in principle with the idea of charging people for missed appointments.”

But he added: “I think in practical terms it could be difficult to do, but I’ve taken a step towards that this week by announcing that when people do miss an appointment they will be told how much that’s cost the NHS.”

NHS medical legal costs- excessive should be capped

The UK government plans to limit excessive fees some lawyers claim in medical negligence cases against the NHS.

UK government plans to limits "excessive fees" some lawyers claim in medical negligence cases against the NHSOfficials want a defined limit on legal costs in cases where the claims are below £100,000, saying that some lawyers submit bills that charge more than patients receive in compensation.

But solicitors warn the move could deny patients access to justice. Figures show the NHS was charged £259 million in legal fees for claims in 2013-14.

The NHS did recoup £74 million by challenging some claims made in 2013-14, but the Department of Health says taking these cases to court is costly and time consuming and believes further savings could be made.

Officials say their proposals, which will be open to public consultation in the autumn, would ensure lawyer’s fees are more proportionate and reflect the amount of compensation patients receive

They give as an example once case where a patient received £11,800 in damages but the legal fees, which the NHS had to recompense, totalled £175,000.

Health Minister, Ben Gummer, said: “Safe, compassionate care is my upmost priority and to achieve this, the NHS must make sure every penny counts.

“Unscrupulously, some lawyers have used patient claims to load grossly excessive costs onto the NHS and charge far more than the patient receives in compensation.”

The Medical Defence Union, which offers doctors guidance on medico-legal issues, supported the move.

Dr Matthew Lee, professional services director for the MDU, said: “Patients often need to meet part or all of these costs themselves but the system must provide access to justice where patients have been negligently harmed.”

“Legal fees must, therefore, be affordable and proportionate.”

“If it was decided to introduce a well-thought-out, fixed-cost structure for legal costs in clinical negligence claims that could only be a good thing and should result in legal fees becoming more affordable and proportionate to the compensation claimed by the patient.”