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Poor diabetes care in England leading to preventable deaths

Poor diabetes care in England is leading to preventable deaths, record rates of complications and huge costs to the NHS.

Poor diabetes care in England leading to preventable deathsDiabetes UK says the disease is the fastest growing health threat of our times and current care models are not working to get on top of the problem.

The NHS spends a tenth of its annual budget on diabetes- but most of the money goes on managing complications not preventing them.

Health Direct notes that Diabetes is currently estimated to cost the UK £23.7 billion and with diabetes becoming more common, this figure is set to rise to £40 billion by 2035-36.

Diabetes is a chronic condition and, if poorly managed, can lead to devastating complications, including blindness, amputations, kidney failure, stroke and early death.

Best-practice guidelines say patients should get regular checks to ensure they are controlling their condition well enough to avoid future complications. But official audits of NHS care in England show many patients do not receive these checks.

Diabetes UK’s own annual snapshot says there has been very little overall improvement in diabetes provision in the past year and that some aspects of care have got worse – such as fewer people with type 1 diabetes receiving an annual check-up.

It says just 41% of people with type 1 diabetes – which must be treated with insulin – receive all the annual checks recommended by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, and only 16% meet the three recommended treatment targets for blood sugar, cholesterol and blood pressure.

Young diabetes patients receive fewer vital checks than older patients. There is also wide variation depending on where you live in England.

People with diabetes living in some areas receive better care and treatment than people living in other areas, says the charity.

Barbara Young, Diabetes UK chief executive, said: “This is not a question of spending more money. In fact, better ongoing standards of care will save money and reduce pressure on NHS resources.”

“It’s about people getting the checks they need at their GP surgery and giving people the support and education they need to be able to manage their own condition. Doing this, together with improving diabetes care in hospital, would give people with diabetes a better chance of a long and healthy life, and save the NHS a significant amount of money. We want to work with local authorities to be able to help them put good practice into place.”

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